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17 May 19

Weekly Media Trends (17 May 19)

Trends > 17 May 19

Borkowski Weekly Media Trends: Jeremy Kyle | James Charles | German Women's Football Team | Aldi

Borkowski Weekly Media Trends

If you’ve been enjoying these trends you might also be interested in listening to boss man Mark Borkowski on the Media Masters Podcast this week on which he talked to Paul Blanchard about the future of the industry as well as giving hot takes on topics such as Brexit and the Duke and Duchess of Sussex.

LISTEN HERE

To this week: the big media news has undoubtedly been the canning (after a short stay of execution) of the controversial Jeremy Kyle show by ITV after the death of a contestant shortly after filming.

Around the fringes of the crater caused by this bombshell it’s been an active week of stunts, from Air BnB resurrecting the Spice Girls Bus, to Hawksmoor making the most of a staffing error involving a £4,500 bottle of wine, and even encompassing an all-Tweeting, all-farting Donald Trump robot in China.

 
Jeremy Kyle Show: The burning questions

First let’s address Jeremy Kyle: the sorry chain of incidents from suspension to leaked emails to cancellation has thrown up a range of questions:

Does this signal a wider crisis for ITV?

Is this the end of exploitation reality TV as we know it?

Should the makers of Love Island be worried?

What next for Jeremy himself?

Can he eventually emerge from his own train wreck with reputation intact?

…perhaps as a candidate for the Brexit Party?
 
 
German Women's Football Team: Could Virality help Equality
 
It took The Germany Women's football team all of 88 seconds to form a brand and identity, devoid of their male counterparts.

We play for a nation that doesn’t even know our names
We've been European champions three times, right? Wrong! Try eight times.
Since we started, we haven’t just fought opponents.

Even the English subtitles on their viral team announcement this week tell an incredibly powerful story.

They address the prejudice they’ve faced with defiance and dignity. The trolls that have stalked women’s football since its professionalisation have been difficult to shrug off. Former Arsenal player and pundit Alex Scott has struggled to deal with the toxic and incessant abuse plaguing the Twittersphere.

It’s an empowering video, but more than that they’ve created an identity for themselves which is totally separate from the footballing juggernaut that is the German men’s team – something women’s football teams have struggled with since they went professional.

Understanding and harnessing the power of social media isn’t exclusive to the women’s game. The Ajax men’s football team have developed a distinctive formula of social media marketing under the leadership of Marc Overmars and Edwin Van Der Sar which has flourished over the past 12 months.

The club has successfully appealed to their current talented crop of players (a group reminiscent of the legendary ’95 champions league winning team) to create emotive, engaging videos that foster team spirit, and have complimented the team’s scarcely believable on-pitch success this season to galvanize the club’s brand in a market dominated by financial superstructures.

This kind of social media engagement is having a huge impact on consumers and professional alike.

 
James Charles: A 'make-up call' for Influencers?

Earlier this week, James Charles, the 19 year-old make-up mogul and nascent social media giant, lost millions of followers across his various platforms after fellow influencer, make-up artist (and Charles’ personal mentor) Tati Westbrook posted a video explosively accusing him of betrayal after Charles promoted a direct competitor of her Halo Beauty brand.

On one hand one wonders if JC’s actions really justified him being labelled ‘a danger to society’ by fellow beauty influencer Jeffree Star, unfollowed by others like Kylie Jenner and Shawn Mendes, and having his channels flooded with videos documenting his devastating loss of followers and fans smashing up his makeup collections.

Then again influencers’ social media posts are their livelihood. They shouldn’t post anything without thinking it through, and the evidence suggests that Charles’ original post was, if not duplicitous, then at least incredibly na├»ve.

It’s too early to properly quantify the extent of the damage done by his former mentor, but this week’s drama is a warning sign to influencers everywhere that their industry is now sufficiently established that every decision risks repercussions if not weighed-up strategically: the Wild West era of Influencer marketing is over.

 
Aldi Square Sausage: Not with a banger, but with a whimper (in Scotland anyway...)

Aldi’s announcement that they were ‘introducing’ a square sausage (a delicacy that has been a mainstay of fry-ups North of the Wall for decades) has caused something of a ‘stramash’ in Scotland. We asked our resident Scot to review the announcement:

“A week that should have been triumphant: our Lord and Master Sir Andy Murray bending as low as his resurfaced hip would allow him to accept his knighthood should have monopolised the headlines from Teuchter TV to the Auchenshoogle Gazette and even the ‘Gonnae No Dae That’ Podcast.

But our mighty protector’s moment of glory was usurped by a classic example of cultural appropriation, racism and overall imperialist English arrogance as an (admittedly German-owned) supermarket chain decided to erase the culinary heritage of 5.4million people in one product announcement.

Lorne Sausage, or ‘square sausage’ to the uninitiated, was advertised in a Scottish newspaper as early as 1896 and has been the lynchpin of breakfast since time imemorial: it is a Scottish enlightenment marvel, perhaps our nation’s greatest feat of engineering since the television. Imagine it; a sausage that fits in a breakfast roll without rolling out!

For years expats have told the heathens of this revolution in design, mechanics, cuisine, art even, only to be shut down (‘what’s wrong with regular sausages?’) and now, finally, we gain the mainstream recognition for which we have spent centuries fighting atop the bones of our ancestors only NOT TO BE CREDITED with popularising it.

If this had happened in 2014 we’d be sawing a Panama Canal-style trench through Berwick-upon-Tweed as we speak. I feel sick with rage just thinking about it.”
 
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